THE FLOOR
MOVEMENT STUDIO - COMMUNITY SPACE

FALL 2019 ARTISTS

FALL 2019 ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE


NATTIE TROGDON & HOLLIS BARTLETT

photo: Alice Chacon

photo: Alice Chacon

Our work stems from our curiosity of the human body; researching its form, function, and feelings to create authentic movement that explores the relationship between athleticism and catharsis. The work we create is embedded with the effort we’ve put into our partnership- two minds and bodies balancing each other out. Our process starts from a shared interest that we approach from separate view points, and is lead by investigations into our bodies, our partnership, and our society. Our research is rooted in improvisation and our post-modern lineage, combined with highly codified forms, narrative, and loosely structured explorations. We aim to communicate our shared humanity through our bodies onstage- their relationship to each other and the journey we take together. Understanding our context as a white cis gendered male/female couple is essential to recognizing our privilege and blindspots, and we strive to make work that transcends these boundaries while also asking questions that aren’t limited to our identities.


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Sheila Anozier is a singer, dancer, choreographer and visual artist Sheila Anozier is a performer and artistic collaborator who's main focus and inspiration is the rich tradition of Haitian art. Her studies with master folklorists and teachers, Pat Hall and Georges Vilson, have guided her in integrating the modern with the ancestral traditions of her family and community. The joy that is released through her art has helped her and others express the intersection of cultures that is so important to the immigrant based communities that make up America.


photo: Sarah Berman

photo: Sarah Berman

Brendan Drake is a dance artist using theater, performance art, satire, and disparate movement forms to interrogate issues surrounding sexuality, gender expression, homophobia and power dynamics. Through a choreographic approach, he knits together formal and conceptual ideas while layering a range of emotional experiences, from the tragic to the comic. Humor, in particular, is crucial to his process in order to sharply criticize the culture at large. He believes laughter generates a level of trust between the performers and audience, creating permission to let our guard down and experience something personal, possibly uncomfortable, in order to be surprised by it.